Money in Politics

Money in Politics

Special interest money pollutes everything that politicians do in Washington. More than a century ago, when Republican Teddy Roosevelt was President, Congress recognized the obvious corruption wrought by corporate money in politics, and passed the Tillman Act, completely prohibiting corporations from giving money to political candidates or parties. But in 2010, a tone-deaf Supreme Court ruled exactly opposite, in the notorious Citizens United case, allowing corporations to spend unlimited amounts influencing elections. One giant step backward.

In a perfect world, Americans would rise in unison to demand a constitutional amendment to override Citizens United: when it comes to elections, corporations are not people, and money is not speech, and Congress should be able to impose reasonable limits on the timing and amount of campaign fundraising and spending. But the reality is that amending the Constitution is extraordinarily difficult – requiring supermajorities in both Houses of Congress and among the state legislatures. A very heavy lift. But that doesn’t mean it’s not worth trying, at the very least to educate and mobilize people.

In the meantime, we can:

Unlike practically every Republican candidate in the country, I refuse to take money from corporate PACs or lobbyists. I will personally match every dollar contributed to my campaign by a person within this district. I will be nobody’s Congressman but your own. You will never have to scratch your head wondering if that vote I cast was for my corporate benefactors, or for the people of this great district.